Preserving Art – How to picture framing – Part Two

This post was written by Eric Martin Schmidt, one of the owner/operators of Art Source & Design in Kansas City.

This is Part Two of a two part series on “how to” picture framing. If you are feeling spicy, check out Part One.

Increase enjoyment and lifespan of your artwork, prints or photographs.

Investing in conservation materials is a smart move no matter how you slice it.

PART ONE OF THIS SERIES COVERED:

  1. What is preservation (or conservation) matting and framing?
  2. What should I look for in a frame shop?
  3. What techniques and materials should be used for mats?

PART TWO OF THIS SERIES WILL COVER:

  1. What materials should be used for glazing?
  2. What materials should be used for frames?
  3. What are safe places to hang or store my framed objects?

PART TWO

What materials should be used for glazing?

  • Glazing should only be glass or acrylic sheets. Acrylic sheets are lighter and shatterproof, but develop a static charge, and should not be used with dry, unfixed pastels, charcoals, soft pencil or any other powdery media. The static charge may displace the powdery media..
  • Sunlight and fluorescent lights emit high amounts of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Glass and acrylic can both be bought with an added UV filtering component to reduce the damaging effects from UV.
  • Glass comes in varying types to reduce light reflection and enhance viewing.
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What materials should be used for frames?

  • Frames can either be wood or metal.
  • Frames should be strong enough and have a deep enough rabbet to hold the mat package securely inside the frame.
  • The mat package should be held in place securely with staples or glazing points.
  • The back should be sealed with paper to prevent dust and air pollution entering the frame package.
  • Two hangars should be used in all but small pictures (less than 8”x8″). This provides easy adjustment and long term stability.
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What are safe places to hang or store my framed object?

  • Avoid hanging or storing anything in the basement, attic, or any other place with extremes in temperature and humidity. A stable, cool, dry environment is best.
  • Avoid hanging objects in direct sunlight or any other intense light source. Control exposure to ultra violet light through glazing or placement away from a UV source.
  • Avoid hanging framed objects directly above working fire places, radiators or forced air vents.
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If you ever have any other questions feel free to contact us directly and we’ll be happy to help. Info@ArtSourceKC.com or 913-962-6000.

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Here is Part One if you missed it.

2 Comments

  1. Jake at Big Picture Framing says:

    Great advice. We’re always looking for new language and ways to explain the best framing methods to our customers. And we were happy to find another interesting framer’s site.

    • eric says:

      Thanks Jake!!! I am trying to build up this resource to help educate my clients and it seems to be working. Had a client the other day that had never been in my store but had spent time on the website and she already knew exactly what she wanted – pretty awesome.

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